Fashion and Style

Early Western travelers, traveling whether to Persia, Turkey, India, or China, would frequently remark on the absence of change in fashion in the respective places. The Japanese Shogun’s secretary bragged (not completely accurately) to a Spanish visitor in 1609 that Japanese clothing had not changed in over a thousand years.However, there is considerable evidence in Ming China of rapidly changing fashions in Chinese clothing. Changes in costume often took place at times of economic or social change, as occurred in ancient Rome and the medieval Caliphate, followed by a long period without major changes. In 8th-century Moorish Spain, the musician Ziryab introduced to Córdoba sophisticated clothing-styles based on seasonal and daily fashions from his native Baghdad, modified by his own inspiration.

Similar changes in fashion occurred in the 11th century in the Middle East following the arrival of the Turks, who introduced clothing styles from Central Asia and the Far East. The beginning in Europe of continual and increasingly rapid change in clothing styles can be fairly reliably dated. Historians, including James Laver and Fernand Braudel, date the start of Western fashion in clothing to the middle of the 14th century, though it should be noted that they tend to rely heavily on contemporary imagery and illuminated manuscripts were not common before the fourteenth century. The most dramatic early change in fashion was a sudden drastic shortening and tightening of the male over-garment from calf-length to barely covering the buttocks, sometimes accompanied with stuffing in the chest to make it look bigger. This created the distinctive Western outline of a tailored top worn over leggings or trousers. The pace of change accelerated considerably in the following century, and women and men’s fashion, especially in the dressing and adorning of the hair, became equally complex.

Art historians are therefore able to use fashion with confidence and precision to date images, often to within five years, particularly in the case of images from the 15th century. Initially, changes in fashion led to a fragmentation across the upper classes of Europe of what had previously been a very similar style of dressing and the subsequent development of distinctive national styles. These national styles remained very different until a counter-movement in the 17th to 18th centuries imposed similar styles once again, mostly originating from Ancien Régime France. Though the rich usually led fashion, the increasing affluence of early modern Europe led to the bourgeoisie and even peasants following trends at a distance, but still uncomfortably close for the elites – a factor that Fernand Braudel regards as one of the main motors of changing fashion.

Hippie Headbands: A Hippie Fashion Trend

The 1960’s gave rise to a hippie subculture which was originally a youth movement throughout the US. Not only did it spread to other countries, but it has had resurgence in recent years for young and old alike. Such shows as That 70s Show are no doubt partially responsible, but the fashion industry has taken note, and we are seeing hippie headbands, and fashion everywhere these days.

Both men and women in the hippie movement wore jeans and maintained long hair, wore sandals or went barefoot. Men frequently grew beards and women refused to wear makeup and bras. They wore brightly colored clothes in unusual styles which included bell bottom jeans, vests, tie dyed clothes, dashikis, peasant skirts and blouses, and those famous hippie headbands which they adopted from the Native Americans. Additionally they adopted styles from Asian, Indian, African and Latin American cultures.

Hippies were known for wearing handmade clothing because their beliefs included defying corporate culture. Because of this they not only learned to make clothes; they bought them from flea markets and second hand shops.

Many may not know that the hippie scene actually rose from the beatnik scene of the 1950s. The ideologies were originally the same as well as the values.

Hippie fashions and values completely changed our culture, influencing music, television, literature and the arts as well as morals and religious beliefs. As you might imagine, tons of hippie clothes, ideals and other aspects of hippie culture have become part of our mainstream culture today. From church movements to cultural diversity, the concepts have been accepted more and more over the last several decades.

The hippie music festivals is only one of the many celebratory ways we embrace the effects of the hippie culture in modern times.

At these festivals hippie symbols and iconography are everywhere including the peace sign which can be seen on peace clothing, tie dye clothing, hippie jewelry, other forms of hippie fashion, and even the occasional peace sign tattoos.

Girls are known to wear gypsy skirts, which are peasant skirts, or broomstick skirts, often tie dyed and hippie dresses of similar fashion. Hippie tapestries are often draped or cut and sewn into dashikis or dresses as well.

In particular there were a myriad designs of hippie headbands. These bohemian headbands were often braided out of leather or fabric of most any type. The chic headbands of the 1980s were a throwback to them, but the 60s headbands were not typically elastic like those of the 1980s. The fashion trend included the use of bandanas or a simple cord tied around the head in various styles. These boho headband accessories didn’t have to match an outfit in particular, and therefore often had personal meaning or were worn as either a statement or to commemorate something in many instances.

The sight of the hippie headband was a sure sign in the 60s that a hippie was in your presence. This often brought derision from those who withstood the morals of the hippie movement. Their hippie clothes and head wraps were then seen as the costumes of foolish youngsters. Now people want to know where they can find a hippie store!

The hippie bands at the festivals wear clothes and headbands often made more modern with some type of new fashion flair. The popular piercings add a new twist to the hippie look, as well as dreadlocks often sported by neo-hippies these days.

Fashion changes, but hippie headbands, fashion, clothes and music are here to stay!

Boho Is Back, Conscious, Holistic Fashion!

Funky and chill, free spirited Bohemian fashion, conscious design that is holistic and now more necessary than ever. Patchwork gypsy skirts and hippy yoga pants, embroidered caftans, colorful tribal, paisley prints and chunky bead jewelry are totally in style. With a resurgence of design styles and fashion icons ramping up its popularity, bohemian hippy chic fashion is known for its earthy wanderlust roots and relaxed vibe.

Travelers of the old world “Banjara” were gypsy wanderers, who wanted to be different and lived life on their choice set of rules, creating trends and not following a social dictum.The boho lifestyle and clothing is based on the diverse gamut of cultures and patterns with the archetype of mixing and layering clothes, prints and colors. Earthy conscious designs, upcycled vintage fabrics, traditional handloom prints and weaves, the choices are endless. Mix and match Indian chikankari tunics with cutout ragged jeans! Georgette tunic dresses as beach cover ups, or use the white shift dresses for yoga and meditation, adding on accessories like the earthing malabeads and copper bracelets, seeking nature and connecting to mother earth.

The boho style sees Priyanka Chopra donning a cute cutout midi dress in tie dye at the country festivals, the Boho vibe is casually chic and elegant. Mylie Cyrus wears the colorful bohemian sari mini skirt with a white blouse tucked in at the waist.

The newer side of this trend has moved onto a “hippie-luxury” style with fashion designers creating earthing luxury style collections overflowing with old style fabrics full of passion and tranquil colors. The dreamy bohemian fashionista plays with long maxi skirts, soft flirty tunic caftans, embroidered dresses and earthy stonewashed fabrics.

The ultra modern Bohemian grounds herself to Mother Earth, rejoicing in her love and radiates confidence through her choice of earthy colors. The style manifests in the romance of original tribal art with pure cotton and ethical fabrics. Upcycled saris made into skirts and dresses, the fun and playful look is easy to accessorize and you create a fashion statement like no other as these are so unique and one of a kind.

Street style bohemian can be funky or chic, the gauzy printed maxidress is good for all seasons. Sandals and a hat for the summer or add a light jacket and booties for cooler days. The authentic tribal patchwork design skirts and boho vintage pants contrasts with the bold black tank, mixing bohemian with city chic. Be a glamorous fashionista, create your own style – conscious, holistic, earth friendly and in tune with nature, using clothing artisan created and unique.

Be a Boldly Mogul Bohemian Fashionista!